Retractor - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics (2022)

Once the retractor is docked and prior to incising the disk space, a stimulation probe permits direct stimulation of any tissue overlying the disk space and excludes the presence of a motor nerve.

From: Lumbar Interbody Fusions, 2019

Related terms:

  • Neoplasm
  • Suture
  • Cauterization
  • Dissection
  • Incision
  • Osteotomy
  • Fracture
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Instrumentation

Michael S. Baggish MD, FACOG, in Atlas of Pelvic Anatomy and Gynecologic Surgery, 2021

Retractors

During contemporary abdominal surgery, a self-retaining retractor is essential. Several types are available, ranging from the frame type (Bookwalter and Kirschner) to the spreading type (O’Sullivan-O’Connor). The modern frame retractor has the advantage of remote location, that is, location outside of the abdominal cavity. Its varied blades may be placed within the abdomen and interchanged when necessary without compromising exposure or completely removing the retractor (Fig. 4.9A to B).

The O’Sullivan-O’Connor retractor and the Balfour retractor are the most commonly used devices for pelvic surgery. The O’Sullivan-O’Connor retractor is easy to use and has a sufficient variety of blades to satisfy most clinical conditions. This retractor is equally suitable for transverse and vertical incisions (Fig. 4.10A and B). The Balfour retractor is also a mainstay abdominal retractor in gynecologic and obstetric surgery. This devicemay be alternatively fitted with standard or deep lateral retractor pieces (Fig. 4.10C and D).

Among the many useful instruments for vaginal surgery are the weighted speculum and the Haney, Sims, Dever, and Breisky-Navratil retractors (Fig. 4.11A to D). The small Richardson retractor is particularly ideal for insertion beneath the anterior cervical circumcision (during vaginal hysterectomy) to facilitate entry into the vesicouterine space (Fig. 4.11E and F). Breisky-Navratil retractors are needed for deep vaginal work (e.g., paravaginal repair) (Fig. 4.11G).

Malleable retractors are well suited to protect the bladder, colon, and other structures during surgery. They are usually available in narrow or wide widths and can be bent to shape for more or less any specific intraoperative need (Fig. 4.11H).

The long-handled vein retractor is the instrument of choice for moving and retracting large vessels (e.g., the external iliac vein) during exposure of the obturator fossa or the hypogastric artery during ureteral dissection (Fig. 4.11I and J).

The Direct Anterior Approach

Michael Nogler, in Surgical Treatment of Hip Arthritis, 2009

Placement of the Retractors

The ventral retractor is kept in place. All other retractors are removed from their positions. A sharp retractor is positioned in the middle of the acetabulum and orientated medially. One can scratch along the bone until soft tissue is reached and then place this retractor around the transverse ligament (Fig. 11-12).

A sharp retractor is placed lateral to the acetabulum. Occasionally it is necessary to make a small nick in the capsule to facilitate placement of this retractor. The remaining parts of the labrum are removed.

The dorsal capsule (it usually forms a roll) is incised in the middle of the acetabulum. This is at 6 o'clock in the middle of the dorsal portion of the capsule. A double-pronged Mueller retractor is placed at the dorsal rim of the acetabulum.

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Degenerative Disorders of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

Frederick M. Azar MD, in Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 2021

Approach for Use of Tubular Retractor

Alternatively, the approach can be made using a tubular retractor, which further minimizes damage to the paraspinal muscles and prevents detachment of the lumbodorsal fascia from the supraspinous ligament. A curved drill is required for visualization when drilling bone through the tubular retractor because of the narrower operating corridor.

With fluoroscopic guidance, place an 18-gauge needle through the skin and into the paraspinous muscles with a trajectory toward the target disc space, approximately the radius of the final retractor diameter away from the edge of the spinous process (e.g., 8 mm off the edge of the spinous process if the ultimate tubular retractor diameter will be 16 mm) to prevent conflict between the spinous process and tubular retractor. It is essential that the needle be orthogonal with the target disc because itwill be used to define the center of the tubular approach. Typically it is best to place the needle in line with the superior endplate of the caudal vertebral body, but that depends on the type of herniation and its location.

(Video) Retraction & Fatigue

Infiltrate the operative field (paraspinous muscle, subcutaneous tissue, and skin) with 10 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine with epinephrine for preemptive analgesia and hemostasis.

Make a 20-mm long incision centered on the needle stick and place the blunt end of the guidewire just through the lumbodorsal fascia. The younger and more fit the patient, the more force necessary to pop the blunt end of the guidewire through the fascia. Do not use the sharp end of the guidewire or advance the guidewire down to bone because it is very easy to pierce the interlaminar space and dural sac with the guidewire.

Once the guidewire is through the fascia, advance the first pencil-shaped dilator through the fascia over the guidewire and use it to gently probe for the trailing edge of the cephalad lamina, which should feel like a bump at the end of the dilator. The guidewire can be removed as soon as the lumbodorsal fascia is pierced with the first dilator.

Sequentially dilate down to bone with enlarging tubular retractors to expose the interlaminar space. Each dilator can be used as a curet to remove soft-tissue attachments from the interlaminar space.

Mount the final tubular retractor to a stationary arm attached to the table and obtain a final fluoroscopic image to confirm the location of the retractor orthogonal with the target disc space before bringing in the microscope and adjusting the field of view. We prefer 14- to 16-mm diameter tubular retractors for this approach, depending on the size of the patient and the level of surgical experience with this technique. Tubular retractors in the 18- to 24-mm diameter range can be used when first becoming familiar with this approach. From this point on, the surgical technique is essentially the same for both approaches.

Identify the ligamentum flavum and lamina. Use a curet to elevate the superficial leaf of the ligamentum flavum from the leading edge of the caudal lamina.

Use a Kerrison rongeur to resect the superficial leaf of the ligamentum flavum to allow identification of the critical angle, which is junction of the leading edge of the caudal lamina and the medial edge of the superior articular process. Identifying the critical angle is essential in primary microlumbar discectomy because it has a constant relationship to the corresponding pedicle, traversing nerve root, and target disc. The pedicle is always just lateral to the critical angle, the traversing nerve is always just medial to the pedicle, and the disc of interest is always just cephalad to the critical angle and pedicle. It sometimes is necessary to drill the medial aspect of the inferior articular process to allow adequate visualization of the critical angle.

Use a high-speed drill to remove the trailing edge of the cephalad lamina up to the insertion of the ligamentum flavum to allow easier and more complete removal of the ligament, keeping in mind that the ligament attaches to the lamina as you move medially. This makes initially detaching the ligament from the undersurface of the cephalad lamina with an angled curet much easier toward the midline.

After the lateral portion of the ligamentum flavum has been detached from the caudal edge of the superior lamina and the cephalad edge of the inferior lamina with a curet, use a blunt dissector to lift the edge of the ligamentum flavum so that it can be excised with a Kerrison rongeur. Take care to orient the rongeur parallel to the nerve root as much as possible. The goal when resecting the ligamentum flavum should be removal in one piece, which prevents nibbling away at it while trying to grab and mop end with the rongeur. En bloc removal is made easier by using the rongeur to remove some bone along with the lateral edge of the ligamentum flavum from caudal to cephalad, starting at the critical angle and working up the medial edge of the superior articular process where the ligamentum flavum attaches (Fig. 39.27).

Once the ligamentum flavum is removed, the medial wall of the corresponding pedicle should be palpable with a nerve hook or angled dissector. If not, more bone may need to be removed lateral to the critical angle. Once the medial wall of the corresponding pedicle is identified, the traversing nerve can be found just medial to it and the target disc can be found just cephalad to it.

When the nerve root is identified, carefully mobilize the root medially. Gently dissect the nerve free from the disc fragment to avoid excessive traction on the root. Bipolar cautery for hemostasis is helpful. When mobilized, retract the root medially. If the root is difficult to mobilize, consider that a conjoined root may be present.

Make a gentle extradural exploration beneath the nerve with a 90-degree blunt hook, taking care not to tear the dura. The small opening and magnification can make the edge of the dural sac appear to be the nerve root.

When using bipolar cautery, ensure that only one side is in contact with the nerve root to avoid thermal injury to the nerve. Epidural fat is not removed in this procedure.

Insert the suction/nerve root retractor with its tip turned medially under the nerve root and hold the manifold between the thumb and index finger. With the nerve root retracted, the disc is now visible as a white, fibrous, avascular structure. Under magnification, small tears may be visible in the annulus.

Enlarge the annular tear with a Penfield no. 4 dissector and remove the disc material with the appropriate-sized pituitary rongeur. Do not insert the instrument into the disc space beyond the angle of the jaws, usually about 15 mm, to minimize the risk of anterior perforation and vascular injury. Downward pressure on the adjacent intact annulus can sometimes help express loose disc fragments from the subannular space (Fig. 39.28).

Remove the exposed disc material. Remove additional loose disc or cartilage fragments. Inspect the root and adjacent dura for disc fragments. Forcefully irrigate the disc space using a Luer-Lok syringe and an unused no. 8 suction tip inserted into the disc space. Maintain meticulous hemostasis.

The discectomy is complete when (1) the lateral recess is adequately decompressed; (2) the 90-degree dissection can be probed to the back of the cephalad vertebral body, the disc space, and the back of the caudal vertebral body out to the midline without any protrusions into the canal; (3) the 90-degree dissector can be spun (helicopter maneuver) beneath the traversing nerve root without any restrictions; and (4) the traversing nerve root is freely retractable both medially and laterally. It is comforting to see the dura pulsate with the heartbeat and expand and contract with respiration, but these findings alone do not indicate an adequate discectomy and decompression.

If the expected pathologic process is not found, review preoperative imaging studies for the correct level and side. Also obtain a repeat radiograph or fluoroscopic image with a metallic marker at the disc level to verify the level. Be aware of bony anomalies that may alter the numbering of the vertebrae on imaging studies.

Close the fascia and the skin in the usual fashion using absorbable sutures if using the McCulloch retractor. When using a tubular retraction, it can simply be removed and the skin closed subcutaneously because the lumbodorsal fascia will seal itself like Chinese finger cuffs when the paraspinous muscles contract, because the lumbodorsal fascia was only dilated between its fibers and not incised.

Permanent Pacemaker and Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation in Adults

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1 Weitlaner retractor,

inches

1 Gelpi retractor,

inches

2 Army-Navy retractors,

inches

1 Richardson retractor, 1 ×

inch

1 Richardson retractor,

×
inches

1 Richardson retractor, 2 ×

inches

2 Senn retractors, sharp,

inches

1 Volkmann retractor,

inches

1 Mayo scissors, straight,

inches

1 Metzenbaum scissors, curved, 7 inches

2 Needle holders, Mayo-Hegar, 7 inches

2 Cushing forceps, 8 inches

2 Adson forceps, delicate tissue,

inches

1 Debakey forceps, vascular,

inches
(Video) Overview and Introduction in the Operating Room / Delivery Room: Student Nurse Perspective.

1 Allis forceps, tissue,

inches

3 Crile forceps, straight,

inches

3 Crile forceps, curved,

inches

1 Petit-Point Mixter forceps, right angle,

inches

2 Backhaus towel forceps,

inches

1 Jarit wire cutter,

inches

4 no. 10 scalpels

10-pack 18-inch 0 silk on pop-off CT-1 needles

2-inch × 36-inch 3-0 Vicryl on CT-1 needles

2 × 18-gauge thin-walled syringes

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Entropion

Myron Yanoff MD, in Ophthalmology, 2019

Retractor Reattachment

In most cases of involutional entropion, retractor plication or reattachment effectively corrects the defect.52 In patients without posterior lamellar foreshortening, a transcutaneous approach is appropriate. A 4–0 silk traction suture is passed horizontally through the central lower eyelid margin and clamped to the drape overlying the brow (Fig. 12.5.3). A cutaneous incision is made 4 mm inferior to the eyelid margin (or 2.5 mm inferior to the lower lid lashes). This extends from immediately lateral to the lacrimal punctum to beyond the lateral canthal angle. The orbicularis muscle is buttonholed at the junction of the pretarsal and preseptal subunits (seeChapter 12.1) and separated for the full length of the skin incision (Fig. 12.5.4). A myocutaneous flap is developed from the incision to the inferior orbital rim.

The “free edge” of the capsulopalpebral fascia is often visualized several millimeters inferior to the tarsal border. The orbital septum can be buttonholed 1 mm inferior to its fusion with the capsulopalpebral fascia and opened the horizontal length of the anterior lamellar incision. An important surgical landmark is the lower eyelid fat, which rests between the septum and fascia. The three lower lid fat pads may be dissected from the anterior surface of the capsulopalpebral fascia (Fig. 12.5.5). If necessary, profoundly prolapsed fat may be debulked.

The capsulopalpebral fascia is then advanced upward and reattached to the inferior tarsal border (Figs. 12.5.6–12.5.8). Fascial identification can be confirmed by grasping the tissue in toothed forceps and having the patient gaze inferiorly. When gross disinsertion is present, the fascia is advanced to the inferior tarsal border. In cases in which the fascia is attenuated but not disinserted, the fascia is surgically disinserted by the surgeon, a narrow horizontal strip excised, and the remaining fascia reattached to the inferior tarsal border. Reattachment to the tarsus is performed with several interrupted 6–0 Prolene sutures.53

In patients demonstrating preseptal orbicularis muscle override, a 5–8 mm vertically wide horizontal strip of preseptal muscle is extirpated en bloc from the muscle's posterior surface (Fig. 12.5.9). The skin incision can be closed with a running 6–0 mild chromic or nylon suture. Topical antibiotic ointment is sufficient for postoperative infection prophylaxis.

Humeral Hemiarthroplasty With Biologic Glenoid Resurfacing

Eddie Y. Lo, Wayne Z. Burkhead, in Operative Techniques: Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (Second Edition), 2019

Step 2: Humeral Osteotomy

Four retractors can be placed to expose the humeral head: Bennett retractor over medial neck, Chandler retractor intraarticularly, deltoid Browne retractor laterally, and a small Hohmann over the rotator cuff (Fig 8.12).

A curved osteotome and rongeur are used to remove the ring of osteophytes around the inferior humeral head.

Once the osteophytes are removed, the true anatomic neck can be identified. An oscillating saw is used to perform the osteotomy of the humeral head (Fig. 8.13).

Step 2 Equpiment

Darrach retractor

Hohmann retractors

Curved osteotome

Mallet

(Video) "Lateral vs. Supine L5/S1 Techniques" With Dr. Mike Selby and Dr. Samir Smajic. Aug 4th, 2022.

Rongeur

Oscillating saw

Step 2 Pearls

Excellent exposure of the humeral head is necessary, including direct visualization of the posterior cuff insertion.

Step 2 Pitfalls

A careless osteotomy with the oscillating saw can risk detachment of the rotator cuff from the proximal humerus.

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Classical (Open) Surgery

Armin Schneider, Hubertus Feussner, in Biomedical Engineering in Gastrointestinal Surgery, 2017

6.1.6 Self-Retaining Retractors

Retractors have to distract incisions and accesses by exerting traction forces on both sides of the access. Accordingly, two hooks are required. If these are connected by a hinge, the distension force can be maintained mechanically (Fig. 6.19).

Retractor - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics (1)

Figure 6.19. Two types of self-retaining retractors: (A) Self-retaining retractor for skin incision (Weilander). The jaws are kept within their selected position by the arresting mechanism with the liver. (B) Four (or more) hooks are mounted on a ring to keep an abdominal incision open (Zenker).

From MITI.

Self-retaining retractors often enable the surgeon to do the operation (usually smaller ones) without the help of an assistant (“solo surgery”) (Fig. 6.20).

Retractor - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics (2)

Figure 6.20. Self-retaining retractor in situ. The two edges of skin/subcutaneous tissues are kept apart, facilitating further tissue dissection in deeper layers.

From MITI.

For larger incisions, in particular of the abdominal wall, more complex devices are in use. In Fig. 6.21 a ring-shaped retractor (Zenker) and an additional pulled hook are shown. The pulled hook is connected to an anchor. The traction can be varied to permit a wide access to the abdominal cavity.

Retractor - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics (3)

Figure 6.21. Abdominal incision. Hooks mounted to the metal ring permit a good access to the abdominal organs. Note the additional pulled hook.

From MITI.

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Basic instruments and tissue handling

G. Dock Dockery, in , 2012

Tissue retractors

Tissue retractors are used to assist the surgeon in exposure of underlying structures, while protecting adjacent important structures. A variety of different styles of tissue retractors are available (Fig. 5.21). The two basic types of retractors are the hand-held and the self-retaining forms. The hand-held retractors allow an assistant to move tissue out of the way of the surgical instruments and protect the vital structures during the procedure. The advantage to the hand-held retractors is that the assistant can easily and quickly reposition them for added exposure and, at the same time, adjust the tension or force on the tissues as needed. The obvious disadvantage is that the surgeon needs the help of another person, the assistant, in order to have good retraction with these instruments. The advantage of the self-retaining retractors is that the surgeon can position this retractor without assistance. The disadvantages of the self-retaining retractors are that they may cause tissue damage by being placed in the incision with too much tension, or they may be left in place for an extended time. Therefore, it is recommended that the self-retaining retractor be repositioned regularly to prevent the constant pressure of the retractor from being isolated to a small area. At the same time, the tension should be adjusted to the minimal amount that allows for adequate exposure.

Skin hooks and regular retractors are preferred in most plastic surgery procedures, since they allow for precise tissue manipulation during the procedure and, because of their design, do not crush tissue during retraction. They may have single, double or triple prongs with sharp or blunt tips. The double-pronged skin hooks provide better holding power, even though the single-pronged skin hooks are used more frequently. Sharp-tipped hooks are preferable to the blunt tips for better ability to perform skin eversion and for maintaining better visualization. Most skin hooks range from

to 6inches in length with an assortment of different sized hooked tips available. The delicate Tyrell skin hook has a 1.5mm diameter, single hook on the tip (Fig. 5.22), while the slightly larger Freer has a 2mm diameter, single or double hook and the Frazier skin hook is 2.5mm in diameter. The standard Wiener skin hook has a 3.5mm diameter, single hook on the tip (Fig. 5.23).

Regular tissue retractors range from 5 to

inches in length. The most common style is the double-ended Senn retractor,
inches in length, with three sharp or blunt curved prongs on one end and an angled blade on the other end (Fig. 5.24). The Ragnell retractor is also a double-ended retractor, 6inches in length, with one 4mm by 8mm angled blade on one end and a 6mm by 15mm angled blade on the other end (Fig. 5.25). The rigid rake retractor, 6.5inches in length, may have either two or three blunt or sharp prongs on one end only (Fig. 5.26).

The two most common self-retaining retractors used in plastic procedures are the 4-inch, cross-action three or four-pronged sharp or blunt self-retaining retractor (Fig. 5.27), the 4-inch, two by three and the three by four blunt or sharp pronged, Weitlaner self-retaining retractor (Fig. 5.28).

(Video) Wedge Drop Wire Clamp Anchor Clamp for FTTH

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Surgery

Timothy J. King, Edward M. Sullivan, in Physician Assistant (Fourth Edition), 2008

Handheld Retractors (Figures 23-13 and 23-14).

Army-Navy and Senn Retractors.

Of the smaller retractors, the Army-Navy and Senn are used to retract small amounts of superficial tissue. The Army-Navy retractor (Figure 23-13, A) has two flat blades of different lengths. The Senn retractor (Figure 23-13, B) has a rake on one end and a flat blade on the other.

Richardson Retractor.

The Richardson retractor (Figure 23-14, A) is manufactured with blade widths from small to large and often has two different blade widths on opposite ends for quick size changes. It is used primarily for retracting tissues within cavities (abdomen and pelvis) and for deep incisions.

Deaver and Harrington Retractors.

The Deaver retractor (Figure 23-14, B) is a curved instrument with a narrow to wide, flat blade. It is used for viscera and abdominal wall retraction. The Harrington or “sweetheart” retractor (Figure 23-14, C), so named because of its characteristic heart-shaped shovel, provides deep retraction within a cavity without disturbance of more superficial structures. This instrument is also used for delicate organs such as the lobes of the liver.

Ribbon or Malleable Retractor.

Another commonly used retractor is the ribbon or malleable retractor (Figure 23-14, D). It has a flat blade and can easily be formed into different useful shapes where preformed retractors prove inadequate. The ribbon retractor is also used to keep the viscera within the confines of the abdomen during closure of an abdominal incision.

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Tympanoplasty—Undersurface Graft Technique

C. Gary Jackson, ... Barry Strasnick, in Otologic Surgery (Third Edition), 2010

Exposing the Middle Ear

The retractor is removed, and an incision is made along the linea temporalis extending anterior and superior to the EAC. A T-shaped incision is created by dropping a vertical limb from the midpoint of the linea temporalis to the mastoid tip (see Fig. 12-5). A Lempert elevator is used to mobilize the periosteum to the level of the ear canal. The vascular strip is identified from posteriorly, grasped with Adson forceps, and held forward in the blade of a Weitlaner retractor along with the auricle (see Fig. 12-5). A second Weitlaner retractor is placed between the temporalis muscle and the mastoid tip at right angles to the first retractor.

The ear canal is copiously irrigated with a physiologic saline solution to remove blood debris. With a 20 gauge needle suction in the surgeon’s left hand and a House No. 2 lancet knife in his or her right hand, the skin of the inferior ear canal is elevated down to the fibrous annulus (Fig. 12-6), creating an inferiorly based flap. Next, a House No. 1 sickle knife is used to develop a superior flap just above the short process of the malleus. The fibrous annulus is mobilized out of its sulcus anterior to the malleus.

If the operating table is rotated away from the surgeon, the anterior drum remnant and annulus are easily seen. If a bony overhang obscures complete vision, the canal skin can be reflected laterally, the bone removed with a small diamond burr, and the skin reflected downward. Care must be taken to protect the anterior annulus and adjacent canal skin.

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FAQs

How many types of retractor are there? ›

The two basic types of retractors are the hand-held and the self-retaining forms. The hand-held retractors allow an assistant to move tissue out of the way of the surgical instruments and protect the vital structures during the procedure.

What is the use of retractor? ›

A retractor is a surgical instrument used to separate and manipulate the edges of a surgical incision or wound, or to hold back underlying organs and tissues so that body parts underneath may be accessed.

What is retractor surgical instrument? ›

Surgical Retractors are used to hold an incision or wound open while a surgeon works. The retractor could also be used to hold tissues or organs out of the way during a surgery. Self-retaining retractors allow hands free operation during a surgery.

What is the use of Morris retractor? ›

The Morris Retractor is used to retract abdominal wall incisions, loin incisions and subcostal wounds. It can fit a diverse variety of wounds at any depth. The handle is fenestrated with an oval ring that can offer easier tractions for an assistant s fingers.

What are retractors made of? ›

Retractors are used to hold an incision or a wound open, to hold an organ or tissue out of the way to expose what's underneath. We stock three broad categories of retractors. These retractors are made of fine German surgical grade steel or titanium.

Who invented the retractor? ›

They are available in many shapes, sizes, and styles. The retractor was invented by Abu al-Qasim, an Islamic physician, over 1000 years ago.

How do you hold a retractor? ›

Retraction & Fatigue - YouTube

What are the 3 categories of surgical instruments? ›

Cutting surgical instruments – Such as blades, knives, scissors and scalpels. Grasping surgical instruments – Anything you use to hold something in place, such as forceps. Retracting surgical instruments – For holding incisions open, or for holding organs and tissues out of the way while you operate.

What is the function of a self-retaining retractor? ›

Self-Retaining Retractors.

Self-retaining retractors have locking mechanisms that keep the blades apart and in place while spreading the edges of the incision and holding other tissue in place, thus freeing the surgeon's and assistant's hands for other tasks.

Which retractor is used in pelvic surgery? ›

The St Mark's retractor is an instrument essential in open pelvic surgery. It is of great help in exposing structures deep in the narrow pelvis.

What is a right angle retractor? ›

Name: Double Bladed Right Angle Retractor or Langenberk's Right Angle Retractor. Sterilization: By autoclaving. Use: To retract different layers of abdominal wall during laparotomy. During herniotomy, retract the abdominal wall.

What are surgical tools called? ›

A surgical instrument is a tool or device for performing specific actions or carrying out desired effects during a surgery or operation, such as modifying biological tissue, or to provide access for viewing it.

What is C retractor? ›

C Shape Retractors offered by us are ideal for teeth whitening. These medical instruments are used by doctors and other medical personnel. The unique shape of these retractors makes diagnosis convenient. We also offer these retractors to the clients at cost effective rates.

What is an abdominal retractor? ›

Novo Surgical Mayo Abdominal Retractor is a hand-held instrument that is primarily used in surgical procedures that require keeping the abdominal cavity open. This retractor is 10" in length and contains a handle with a finger indent to rest the finger on and provide better maneuvering.

What is a malleable retractor? ›

These retractors are made from malleable stainless steel, allowing for easy modification of retractor angle and shape. The blades are available in a variety of sizes depending on the surgeon's need and are commonly used during orbital dissection to keep orbital fat out of the surgical field.

What is double hook retractor? ›

Description: The GPC Double hook retractor is a retractor with hooks on both ends. It is used for retracting the soft tissues during surgery. It is fine retractor hence is used during hand and foot and ankle surgery.

What is Doyen retractor? ›

The Doyen Retractor is a broad based retractor used to pull back soft tissues and widen the surgical field. This is useful in laparotomies and pelvic surgeries like abdominal hysterectomy and caesarean section, as well asretractionsof the urinary bladder. The retractor has an overall length of 28 cm. Brand.

What is the use of needle holder? ›

A needle holder, also called a needle driver (Figure ​1), is made from stainless steel and is used to hold a suturing needle during surgical procedures.

What are West retractors used for? ›

The West Retractor is a self-retaining, finger ring retractor with a cam ratchet lock and 3×4 sharp interlocking teeth. A popular instrument, most commonly used in large bone and joint procedures, but also useful with small, deep incisions and soft tissue dissection at a superficial level.

What is a surgical clamp called? ›

A hemostat (also called a hemostatic clamp, arterial forceps, or pean after Jules-Émile Péan) is a surgical tool used in many surgical procedures to control bleeding.

What is Kelly retractor? ›

Kelly Retractor has a right-angled blade that has a bent crescent-shaped lip. This retractor is commonly used to pull back, or retract, the edges of wounds in order to expose the surgical area. Moreover, it is presented in different blade sizes to adapt to various scenarios.

What is a common retractor used in a total knee replacement? ›

The Gillinov – Maze Retractor is the preferred attachment used with a self-retaining mitral retractor such as the Cosgrove Mitral Heart Retractor.

What is a common retractor used in a total hip replacement procedure? ›

Hohmann retractor

A feature of this retractor is that it can retract tissue at the margin of the joint. In hip arthroplasty, it helps retract tissue at the posterior acetabular brim.

What is a Richardson in surgery? ›

Richardson Retractor is a 9-1/2" long retractor that can be used during procedures, such as chest or abdominal, to grasp soft tissue using the curved blade. Several widths and depths of the blade are available in order to suit the different surgical needs.

What is the most common surgical tool? ›

COMMON SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS
  • SCISSORS.
  • Used for cutting tissue, suture, or for dissection. ...
  • FORCEPS.
  • Also known as non- locking forceps, grasping forceps, thumb forceps, or pick-ups. ...
  • CLAMPS.
  • Also called locking forceps, these are ratcheted instruments used to hold tissue or objects, or provide hemostasis. ...
  • Crile Hemostat:

Who invented surgical instruments? ›

Al Zahrawi is considered the father of operative surgery. He is credited with performance of the first thyroidectomy. The last chapter of his comprehensive book, named “On Surgery”, was dedicated to surgical instruments. He introduced over 200 surgical tools, a staggering number by all standards.

What is mastoid retractor? ›

Mastoid retractor is used commonly in mastoid surgeries. Each of these prongs has 4 teeth. The teeth not only helps in holding the soft tissue apart, it firmly anchors the retractor to the bone. Also used in head & neck surgeries like tracheostomy & thyroidectomy.

What is the meaning of self retaining? ›

n. 1 preoccupation with oneself to the exclusion of others or the outside world.

What is self retaining abdominal retractor? ›

The Surtex® Collin Self Retaining Retractor is a specialized instrument commonly used for retracting incisions in bulky tissues. It is frequently used in bowel surgery and abdominal incisions as well as gynecological procedures to retract tissues for optimum view. Broad Lateral Blades For Clean Retraction.

What is a Harrington retractor? ›

SURTEX® Harrington Retractor is a hand-held device that allows surgeons to mobilize, retract and statically hold the soft tissues within the abdominal cavity during specialized surgical procedures.

Which retractor is used during a lumbar laminectomy? ›

Novo Surgical's Beckman Laminectomy Retractor is made for use in neurosurgical procedures of the spinal cord. Specifically this retractor can be used in laminectomy procedures in which the lamina of the vertebrate is removed.

What is an Army Navy retractor? ›

US Army Retractor is used to expose surface layers of skin, commonly in plastic surgery procedures. It is a double-ended retractor with a fenestrated handle. The blades at each end are angled 90 degrees and also have a slightly curved, rounded lip. The blades also face in the same direction.

What is a towel clip? ›

The towel clamp is a versatile instrument that is useful in a variety of surgical circumstances. We find it particularly useful in securing and retracting tissue during excision of subcutaneous tumors such as cysts or lipomas.

What is Babcock forceps? ›

Babcock Forceps are finger ring, ratcheted, non-perforating forceps used to grasp delicate tissue. They are frequently used with intestinal and laparotomy procedures. Babcock Forceps are similar to Allis forceps. However, they may be considered less traumatic due to their wider, rounded grasping surface.

What is Ovum forceps? ›

Ovum Forceps, available at Surgical Holdings, used to grasp, hold, manipulate and remove tissue from inside the uterus including the ovum and placenta. Ovum forceps are used during procedures such as caesarean section, hysterectomy, and uterine repair and are also sometimes used as a hemostat.

Why is surgical instrument important? ›

Surgical instruments are tools that allow surgeons to open the soft tissue, remove the bone, dissect and isolate the lesion, and remove or obliterate the abnormal structures as a treatment. Bigger tools are used for the initial exposure, and finer ones are used once the delicate structures are encountered.

How many instruments are used in surgery? ›

Instruments can be classified in many ways - but broadly speaking, there are five kinds of instruments. Cutting and dissecting instruments: Scalpels, scissors, and saws are the most traditional.

What are medical tools called? ›

Instruments used in general medicine
InstrumentUses
Stethoscopeto hear sounds from movements within the body like heart beats, intestinal movement, breath sounds, etc.
Suction deviceto suck up blood or secretions
Thermometerto record body temperature
Tongue depressorfor use in oral examination
35 more rows

Which retractor is used during OB GYN procedures? ›

Handheld gynecology retractors commonly used in gynecological procedures are available in patterns such as Breisky, Eastman, Heaney, Jackson, lateral vaginal retractors, Murphy, Lletz, o'Sullivan, Sims, and Torpin Vectus with features such as light guides, gold-tone handles, and insulation.

What is a Kilner retractor used for? ›

Kilner (Cats Paw) Retractor is a handheld, double-ended retractor used to retract primarily surface tissue. It is often used in plastic surgery, small bone and joint procedure. This instrument has one angled, blunt end and, at the opposite end, facing the opposite direction has a three prong, sharp rake tip.

What is an Alexis retractor? ›

The Alexis O C-section protector-retractor provides 360 degrees of atraumatic, circumferential retraction and protection during cesarean section. The Alexis O C-section protector-retractor has been shown to reduce scar pain, postoperative analgesics, blood loss, and surgical site infections. REF.

What is Farabeuf retractor? ›

Farabeuf Retractor is one of the most popular hand-held retractor and it allows surgeons to grasp, retract and statically hold multiple types of tissues during procedures in a broad range of surgical specialties. Double Ended Design With L-Shaped Blades For Reliable Retractions.

What is Balfour retractor? ›

Sklar's® Balfour Abdominal Retractor is a self-retaining retractor used in laparotomy procedures. It may also be used for specific abdominal procedures where the abdomen needs to be held open for examination or evaluation, such as cesarean sections and bowel resection.

Who invented Gelpi retractor? ›

Maurice Joseph Gelpi, M.D. (1883-1939)

What is Ribbon retractor? ›

Ribbon Retractor is offered in a variety of lengths ranging from 6-3/4" to 13". The ideal purpose of this instrument is to be used in procedures where organs or intestines need to be retracted. This retractor is also malleable, which allows it to fit the form of the area that is being operated.

How do you use Bookwalter retractor? ›

Symmetry Surgical : Bookwalter Retractor - YouTube

What are malleable used for in surgery? ›

Ribbon (Malleable) Used to retract deep wounds. May be bent to various shapes to assist in holding back tissue.

What is Kelly retractor? ›

Kelly Retractor has a right-angled blade that has a bent crescent-shaped lip. This retractor is commonly used to pull back, or retract, the edges of wounds in order to expose the surgical area. Moreover, it is presented in different blade sizes to adapt to various scenarios.

What is Doyen retractor? ›

The Doyen Retractor is a broad based retractor used to pull back soft tissues and widen the surgical field. This is useful in laparotomies and pelvic surgeries like abdominal hysterectomy and caesarean section, as well asretractionsof the urinary bladder. The retractor has an overall length of 28 cm. Brand.

What is Deaver retractor? ›

The Deaver Retractor is a large, handheld retractor commonly used to hold back the abdominal wall during abdominal or thoracic procedures. It may also be used to move or hold organs away from the surgical site. The Deaver retractor is shaped like a question mark with a thin, flat blade.

What is Czerny retractor used for? ›

Czerny Retractor is used in general surgical procedures like hernias and laparotomies. It is especially useful during surgical closures, as the central biconvex handle and its central oval fenestration allows the bleeders in the underlying tissues to be visualised and cauterised.

What is a green retractor? ›

Product Description

Green Retractor Fenestrated 8.75": Green Retractor is a handheld, single end retractor most commonly used in thyroidectomy and other procedures in the neck. It has a strongly curved, smooth, fenestrated blade. It also has a teardrop fenestrated handle.

What is a malleable retractor? ›

These retractors are made from malleable stainless steel, allowing for easy modification of retractor angle and shape. The blades are available in a variety of sizes depending on the surgeon's need and are commonly used during orbital dissection to keep orbital fat out of the surgical field.

What is Langenbeck retractor? ›

Langenbeck Retractor is a very popular surgical device that allows surgeons to pull back soft tissues and incision or wound edges during a wide range of general surgeries. Versatile L-Shaped tip for retracting wide slices of tissue. Terminal downward curve for protecting surrounding structures.

What is a right angle retractor? ›

Name: Double Bladed Right Angle Retractor or Langenberk's Right Angle Retractor. Sterilization: By autoclaving. Use: To retract different layers of abdominal wall during laparotomy. During herniotomy, retract the abdominal wall.

What is self-retaining retractor? ›

Self-Retaining Retractors.

Self-retaining retractors have locking mechanisms that keep the blades apart and in place while spreading the edges of the incision and holding other tissue in place, thus freeing the surgeon's and assistant's hands for other tasks.

How do you hold a surgical retractor? ›

Retraction & Fatigue - YouTube

What is C retractor? ›

C Shape Retractors offered by us are ideal for teeth whitening. These medical instruments are used by doctors and other medical personnel. The unique shape of these retractors makes diagnosis convenient. We also offer these retractors to the clients at cost effective rates.

What is the use of bladder retractor? ›

Materials and methods: An internal bladder retractor was used to facilitate dissection of the vascular pedicles during laparoscopic radical cystectomy in a female patient. Results: The application of the retractor is easy and it allows more precise control of the vascular pedicles and ureters.

What is mastoid retractor? ›

Mastoid retractor is used commonly in mastoid surgeries. Each of these prongs has 4 teeth. The teeth not only helps in holding the soft tissue apart, it firmly anchors the retractor to the bone. Also used in head & neck surgeries like tracheostomy & thyroidectomy.

What is an Army Navy retractor? ›

US Army Retractor is used to expose surface layers of skin, commonly in plastic surgery procedures. It is a double-ended retractor with a fenestrated handle. The blades at each end are angled 90 degrees and also have a slightly curved, rounded lip. The blades also face in the same direction.

What is Balfour self retaining retractor? ›

Balfour Abdominal Retractor Self-Retaining is used to hold tissues apart and lock it in a place. This adjustable instrument allows user to use it by adjusting size instead of buying separate sizes. This is commonly used in laparotomy surgeries of the animals.

What is a towel clip? ›

The towel clamp is a versatile instrument that is useful in a variety of surgical circumstances. We find it particularly useful in securing and retracting tissue during excision of subcutaneous tumors such as cysts or lipomas.

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